Mango is often referred to as ‘king of fruits” and for good reason. These immune-boosting Mango Nectar Juice Cubes are rich with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. It’s great to have a stash of mango juice cubes on hand when it’s not mango season to add to water, smoothies and juice blends.  

white ice cube tray filled with mango nectar juice ice cubes.

The flavor of mango is matchless. Just one bite out of the juicy orange flesh of a mango should make a fan out of anyone.

Clear plastic blender pitcher filled with cut mango fruit

I love to have these Mango Nectar Ice Cubes stashed in the freezer, especially when I don’t have any fresh mango on hand. If you’re not new to THK, you know I love flavored ice cubes to add to water, tea, juices and smoothies. I especially love to add them to a glass of water for the added flavor and nutrients. It helps me drink more water during the day. If you like mango, you’ll love these Mango Nectar Ice Cubes!

Mango Nectar Ice Cubes Recipe

You want to use fresh mango for this recipe because it has a much richer and sweeter flavor than frozen mango. You can also add 1/4 cup of fresh squeezed orange juice or pineapple juice to the mix for added flavor and nutrients.

  • Mango – We use 2 large mangoes, peeled and chopped
  • Water – A little water helps to blend and liquify the mango

Find printable recipe with measurements below.

How to Make Them

Mangoes don’t make a very good candidate to juice in a juicer. The flesh is too soft with stringy fiber. Mango nectar juice is a little thicker than most fruit juices, but adding water helps to liquify it.

  1. Cut Mango – Slice the fresh ripe mango flat side down along the seed. Make slices along the flesh. Using a spoon, scoop the flesh away from the peel.
  2. Blend – Add the mango pieces, water and orange juice to the blender, and blend on high for 15-20 seconds until the juice is smooth.  If your juice still has a lot of fiber left after blending, you can strain it through a fine colander or strainer.  You can also add a little more water for a thinner consistency.
  3. Serve – Pour over ice. Enjoy!

Clear plastic blender pitcher filled with blended juice. A cut mango and knife sits next to the pitcher.

When are Mangoes in Season

That depends on where you live. In the United States, mangoes have the longest season in Hawaii from March through November. In California, Mangoes are in season June through August, and in Florida from May to August. However, with imported mangoes coming from Mexico, South America and Asia, you’ll often be able to find mangoes in the markets all year long.

How to Tell When a Mango is Ripe

A perfectly ripe mango will have a strong flowery fragrance at its stem end, and will slightly yield when you gently squeeze it. The skin should have tones of yellow-orange or red which will increase as the fruit ripens. Avoid mangoes that have a loose or shriveled skin, or black spots on the skin which may indicate overripeness and damage to the flesh inside.

white ice cube tray filled with mango nectar juice ice cubes. Cut mango pieces sits next to the tray.

How to Cut a Mango

Cutting a mango can be a bit tricky at first, but once you get the hang of it, it’ll become a breeze.

  • Hold the fruit standing on one of its ends.
  • Slice down one side of the pit vertically, then repeat on the other side. There will be flesh left around the pit.
  • Using a paring knife, score the flesh of each half into cubes. You don’t want to slice all the way through the skin.
  • Using a spoon, scoop along the inside of each half as close to the skin as you can to cut out all of the cubes. Alternately, you can turn each half inside out so the cubes pop outward, then cut away the cubes,
  • Cut away the band of fruit around the pit and peel away the skin. Cut the flesh into pieces.

Two white ice cube trays filled with mango (king of fruits) nectar ice cubes.

Why is Mango Called King of Fruits

Mangoes are called “king of fruit” for various reasons. One reason is because their flavor is a luscious mix of pineapple, oranges and peaches.
 
Another reason they are referred to as “king of fruits” is because they are a rich with nutrients.

A white ice cube tray filled with mango nectar (king of fruit) ice cubes. A plastic bag filled with cut pieces of mango sits next to the white tray.

Benefits of Mango

Mango is a tropical stone fruit and a member of the drupe family. Fruits of the drupe family contain a fleshy outer section that surrounds a pit, and within the pit is a seed. Other members of the drupe family include peaches, plums, cherries and dates.
 
According to some studies, the nutrients found in mangoes contain health-endorsing properties. 
  • Antioxidant rich – Mangoes are rich with polyphenol, a powerful compound that works as an antioxidant which protects the body from oxidative stress linked to inflammation and disease. (1) (2) (3)
  • Aids digestion – Mangoes are a good source of fiber and they’re rich with enzymes that aids the digestive system to break down proteins.
  • Low in calories – They contain a high percentage of water so you get a lot of fruit for few calories (one cup of mango contains fewer than 100 calories). The high water content found in mangoes will also can help keep you hydrated.
  • Vitamins – They’re a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin K. Just one cup of mango provides up to 75% of the daily value (DV) of vitamin C. Vitamin c helps your body build more disease-fighting white blood cells and it’s good for helping your body absorb iron. Green mangoes contain more vitamin C than ripe mangoes. Ripe mangoes contain more vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential to a healthy immune system (4) (5)
  • Minerals – They’re an excellent source of potassium, calcium and magnesium, and they also contain some iron which is good for building red blood cells.

This is an impressive list of health benefits of mango and explains why mangoes are often referred to as “king of fruit”. Having these Mango Nectar Juice Cubes stashed in your freezer (especially when it’s not mango season) to add to water and smoothies is a great way for you to consume more mango so you can take advantage of all the health benefits that mangoes provide. Today more than ever, it’s important to keep our immune system healthy and strong.

A white ice cube tray filled with orange ice cubes. Two slices of oranges sit on top of the tray.

More Immune Boosting Flavored Ice Cubes

Looking for More Mango Recipes

white ice cube tray filled with mango nectar ice cubes
Yield: 6 servings

Mango Nectar Juice Cubes

Prep Time 10 minutes
Additional Time 8 hours
Total Time 8 hours 10 minutes

Mango is often referred to as 'king of fruits" and for good reason. These immune-boosting Mango Nectar Juice Cubes are rich with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. It's great to have a stash of mango juice cubes on hand when it's not mango season to add to water, smoothies and juice blends.  

Ingredients

  • 2 cups mango (about 2 large mangoes)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice (optional)

Instructions

  1. Slice the mango flat side down along the seed. Make slices along the flesh. Using a spoon, scoop the flesh away from the peel.
  1. Add the mango pieces to a blender.
  2. Pour in the water (and orange juice if adding) into the blender with the mango. Blend on high for 15-20 seconds until the juice is smooth.
  3. Using a funnel pour the mango nectar into the ice cube trays.
  4. Freeze for 8 hours or overnight. Remove the mango nectar juice cubes from the ice cube trays and place in a freezer bag to store in the freezer.
  5. Serve in water, add to smoothies, crush the cubes in a blender to eat as slushed ice.

Notes

How to Cut a Mango

Cutting a mango can be a bit tricky at first, but once you get the hang of it, it'll become a breeze.

  • Hold the fruit standing on one of its ends.
  • Slice down one side of the pit vertically, then repeat on the other side. There will be flesh left around the pit.
  • Using a paring knife, score the flesh of each half into cubes. You don't want to slice all the way through the skin.
  • Using a spoon, scoop along the inside of each half as close to the skin as you can to cut out all of the cubes. Alternately, you can turn each half inside out so the cubes pop outward, then cut away the cubes,
  • Cut away the band of fruit around the pit and peel away the skin. Cut the flesh into pieces.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 38Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 4mgCarbohydrates: 9gFiber: 1gSugar: 8gProtein: 1g

theharvestkitchen.com attempts to provide accurate information, however, this nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and is an estimate only. The nutritional information provided comes from online sources and calculations. See full disclaimer on About page.